Videos

Videos

Choice City for Whom?- A poem performed by Catherine Connely reflecting on the experience of being a Woman of Color in Ft. Collins, Colorado, and on the Colorado State University Campus.

Economic Status of Women in Colorado

Part 1: The opening presentation given by Louise Myrland at the Economic Status of Women in Colorado Symposium at Colorado State University. The symposium was an effort on behalf of the Center for Women’s Studies and Gender Research at Colorado State University, The Women’s Foundation of Colorado, and Women Give Larimer County.

Part 2: The panel presentation at the Economic Status of Women in Colorado Symposium at Colorado State University. The symposium was an effort on behalf of the Center for Women’s Studies and Gender Research at Colorado State University, The Women’s Foundation of Colorado, and Women Give Larimer County.

Part 3: The audience question and answer section of the Economic Economic Status of Women in Colorado symposium at Colorado State University. The symposium was an effort on behalf of the Center for Women’s Studies and Gender Research at Colorado State University, The Women’s Foundation of Colorado, and Women Give Larimer County.

Fort Morgan and Race Relations – Ethnic Studies faulty member Eric Ishiwata has been working in Fort Morgan, CO to promote race relations. This project has served as an opportunity for students in CSU’s Department of Ethnic Studies to witness — and participate in — evolving real-world race relations. For more information visit: http://source.colostate.edu/csu-students-support-race-relations-work-in-fort-morgan/#!

CoFED 2015 Summer Institute – Former Ethnic Studies student and CSU Alumna, Angel Smith, participated in the CoFED 2015 Summer Institute. Check out this video to learn more about why Co-Ops and access to healthy food benefit our communities.

 

Restorative Justice – At Hinkley High School in Aurora, Colo., students, parents and administration are meeting face-to-face to resolve student conflict with conversation. The number of physical altercations has taken a nosedive as this new type of disciplinary action, called “restorative justice,” replaces suspension. Hari Sreenivasan has the story

 

NNHAAD Public Service Announcement